Watching Wood Ducks

A wood duck pair landed on a snag.

I wasn’t the only one that noticed. No sooner had the male started his noisy jib-jib-jib-ing, but two squirrels emerged from holes in the same broken tree.

Was I about to see a scuffle?

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Starling Finds a Snag

Our tree guy must have thought I was nuts.

That old, hollow tree is too weak to keep, he said. I nodded, then asked, can we remove just the canopy? Without branches to catch heavy wind and snow, I felt the rest of the tree could safely stand. I was hoping we could save my favorite snag.

The tree guy agreed and did as I asked. But I’m pretty sure he thought the result looked a little odd.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

Tree Love

A Gift that keeps on giving.

That phrase is so very true when it comes to trees. Friends who follow my online musings know I’m smitten by what I call Mother Nature’s Daily Wildlife Show. Much of that theatre takes place in the trees surrounding my lakeside home.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

A Pee-culiar Winter Who-Dunnit

My dog sprinted to a huge patch of yellow snow.

Spots and splotches covered an area about six feet wide. While Finley sniffed, I surveyed the stained snow clinging to branches above.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

Duck Drama

Wood ducks seemed to be studying our squirrel tree.

We call it that because squirrels like to shelter inside. And each spring, at least one new family grows up there. One year, a pregnant raccoon took over the entire tree. But otherwise, for some twenty years, we have watched squirrel mamas, and eventually their pups, scurry in and out of the largely hollow tree.

But last week, I wondered if wood ducks might be moving in.

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Pop! Goes the Weevil (Larva)

I shipped seven pounds of acorns to Kentucky.

Not to feed any under-nourished squirrels. My acorns are for the University of Kentucky’s multi-year, genetic study of white oaks. Foresters believe the white oak is in decline, and the project’s goal is to identify trees with traits suggesting a higher likelihood of success in the forest. The research team hopes to acquire acorns from every county in every state in the white oak’s range.

What will they do with my (and everyone else’s) acorns?

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

Farewell to a Favorite Tree

Our broken, branchless beech finally fell.

The tree was about fifty-five years old* when we bought our home in 2004. On our well-wooded property, it didn’t command any particular notice. Then in 2015, Pileated Woodpeckers chose it for their nest. That was quite a show, which I filmed. But the poor tree! The woodpeckers removed about five gallons of wood to dig a cavity some 19” deep.

That’s when the tree’s trouble—to my eventual great delight—began.
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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

A Snag, a Storm, and a Surprise

Two white-rimmed ears caught my eye.

Something was inside a cavity in our old, broken tree. That snag had a history of sheltering woodland creatures. But the tree was in terrible condition. It was well-rotted.  And the trunk that snapped years earlier was letting that day’s downpour reach inside.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.

The All-You-Can-Eat Squirrely Buffet

Squirrels are such messy eaters!

They toss their food trash everywhere. In fall, it’s discarded acorn caps and broken shells. These days, they’re dropping bud and leaflet leftovers. It’s raining half-chewed twigs and seed clusters, too.

Yesterday, I saw squirrels scarfing down samaras, the maple seeds we call helicopters or whirligigs. The seeds aren’t quite ready to drop from the trees. But you wouldn’t know that by looking at our walkways. Squirrels seem to drop three clusters for every one they eat.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer, Joanna Brichetto.

The Balcony

I just love rotting trees.

They’re wildlife magnets. I’m particularly fond of one such tree just outside my window. It has held my attention since 2015 when Pileated Woodpeckers nested there.

But the snag’s rotten story began about a decade earlier when we had a limb removed.

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Image Credits: Carol Doeringer.